About your Search

20130122
20130122
STATION
CSPAN2 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
MSNBCW 3
KQED (PBS) 2
WETA 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
SFGTV2 1
WGN (CW) 1
LANGUAGE
English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a horse since the day he got here. and thanks to carlin's leadership, thanks to marvin pinkert who he calls the genius behind the development of the new space, all of us as citizens can far better experience our history. as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen i value this place deeply. it's ve
with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
in public spaces? >> i think very carefully, just as in navigated the relationship with lyndon johnson. he went out of his way to avoid taking a public position opposed to johnson on the war or poverty issues. it was only after a great deal of deliberation, a great deal of time had passed, and when he felt like he could do nothing else other than take a public stance. that is what is going on in the black community today. i think all of us recognize that the energy has to come from the grassroots. that those of us who feel that the president needs to go further, and i think it barack obama were sitting here, he would say, yes, i like to go farther in terms of dealing with these issues of poverty and specific issues of the black community, but he would also say, you have to push me. that does not necessarily come from him deciding which are the greatest party as he has to deal with. just as johnson also said, look, i have a lot of priorities as president. if you love me to deal with is a voting rights issue, as king did in 1964 and 1965, you have to push me. king went out and helped stage t
is the king of them all so it's a little bit of a -- lyndon johnson picked up a couple. lyndon johnson and again i'm using every authority i can find. but lyndon johnson i'm sure he picked this up from -- but pressing the flesh was johnson-ism. i will be down there in a flash and lady bird gets credit for motorcade. didn't exist before she comes up with motorcade and it's picked up by "time" magazine. there is no elise written example that has been used before. richard nixon has some nice ones. depending on your point of view. the silent majority is his and excellent ability is a coinage that either he or his speechwriters when they're going over the records of the watergate they use that term. if something is censored or bleeped its deleted which became its own curse word. another one which was really interesting is when he started talking about winding down the war. and winding down seemed to be sort of a winding up. it created some real response at that time. george herbert walker bush came up with new world order which was his. he got that from somewhere else that made it his own a
dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or economic consequences impact on the ratings have been i
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
is the day that 40 years ago today, lyndon johnson died. i think he would have recognized and probably admired that speech yesterday very much. and i think one way of understanding it is to look at it as a reply to ronald reagan in 1981. in the same place ronald reagan got up and said government is not the solution to the problem, government is the problem. yesterday was sort of not only a response to that but almost a bookend as reagan moved the country in a conservative direction. barack obama obviously hopes to move it in a liberal direction. >> the "new york times" editorial had this to say. mr. obama is smart enough to know that what he wants to achieve in his second term must be done in the next two years, perhaps even the first 18 months. there is no doubt that mr. obama has the ambition and intellect to place himself in the first rank of presidents. with this speech, he has made a forceful argument for a progressive agenda that meets the nation's needs. we hope he has the political will and tactical instincts to carry it out. lot of things in that quote, but one that struck me,
an agenda he didn't accomplish most of it it took lyndon johnson to actually make that into law later. it is a tough road but is a good positive strong start this second inaugural address is never as important as a looks. it's still a good step and a solid step i think you'll see a solid presidency second term personal exhaustion. i think at the moment coming off of the election coming off of the inauguration you will see a lot of energy in the white house for the next few months it becomes sort of a drive towards the last minute lame-duck no one in congress at least is paying a lot of attention to any more. by the end of the second term his hair is going to look like marks' probably. his hair was all black when he took office in its nearly all gray now. still ahead an all-star evening who is showing up tonight including the big one hosted by rahm emanuel. a solid gold treatment for cancer how the metal that makes up your favorite jewelry could save your life. hey, buddy? oh, hey, flo. you want to see something cool? snapshot, from progressive. my insurance company told me not to ta
in and attacked that. now, in my opinion that wasn't partisan. it was his vision of america. as lyndon johnson had a vision of the great society. it wasn't anti-republican. it was his vision. john kennedy, the new frontier. i think the president from the way i was taking it was saying i think b this is the vision america needs to go in. but it wasn't for just four years. he said we're not talking four months, four years, or 400 years. >> that's exactly right. and you played the clip talking about how the social safety net allows us to take risks and not fear the failure. other countries don't have that. i spent a lot of time in india where there was such a fear of taking on new initiatives and being entrepreneurial because there wasn't that same safety net in place. that is the progressive vision. let's be real. paul ryan, here's a guy who supports privatizing social security, voucherizing medicare. so the president is not putting up a strawman argument. these are exactly the principles that republicans support. and also republicans have never been comfortable with social security and medicare. th
of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civil rights icon and not as a non-violent resistence icon or labor rights icon. >> he's so much bigger than the box we tend to put him in. in some of those speeches, in the antiwar speeches he was talking about moving beyond tribe, race, class and nation. that's the kind of radical internationalism that we really don't talk about. even president obama's speech today he's saying we're really loyal not to party but to nations. well, king went far beyond that and say we're not loyal to nations. we're loyal to god.
came out for lbj, lyndon johnson's inaugural back in '65. we'll be right back. ou know who. you can part a crowd, without saying a word... if you have yet to master the quiet sneeze... you stash tissues like a squirrel stashes nuts... well muddlers, muddle no more. try zyrtec®. it gives you powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because zyrtec® starts working at hour one on the first day you take it. claritin® doesn't start working until hour three. zyrtec®. love the air. claritin® doesn't start working until hour three. we've decided to we're all having such a great year in the gulf, put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. >>
highest totals of filibusters every recorded. lyndon johnson faced one filibuster during his six years as senate majority leader. in the same span of time, harry reid has faced over 390. lyndon johnson, one; harry reid, 390. legislation is blocked at every turn. the result is not surprising. the senate of the 112th congress passed a record low 2.8% of bills introduced. that's a 66% decrease from the last republican majority in 20 2005-2006 and a 90% decrease from the high in 1955-1956. by every measure, the 112th congress was the most unproductive congress in our history. my republican colleagues have come to the floor and made many impassioned statements in opposition to amending our rules at the beginning of this congress. they say that the rules can only be changed with a two-thirds supermajority, as the current filibuster rule requires. they argue that any attempt to amend the rules by a simple majority is breaking the rules to change the rules. this is simply not true. the supermajority requirement to change senate rules is in direct conflict with the u.s. constitution. article 1,
in this senate? the contrast is enormous from the time that lyndon b. johnson was president of the senate. lyndon b. johnson for six years presiding over this body saw one filibuster. and harry reid in his six years presiding over this senate has seen 391 filibusters. and let me convey that even when you have the votes to end a filibuster, the fact that it is launched creates enormous paralysis. imagine you're debating a bill and you continue debating through the end of the week and you come in the following monday and you debate and nobody has anything to say and so somebody says, "i ask unanimous consent that we have a final vote on this bill." now, you see, we don't have a previous question, motion on this floor, so one has to ask for unanimous consent. any of a hundred senators can weigh in and say "no." and when they they weigh in and say "no" on that monday, on tuesday, a petition is put forward with 16 senators saying, let's have a vote on closing debate. and that vote can't happen until thursday, under the rules. and if it's successful on a thursday, you have to have 30 hours more of deba
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)